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Hidden in plain sight: sex and gender in global pandemics

January 16, 2021

Purpose of review: The global pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory virus coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has a male bias in mortality likely driven by both gender and sex-based differences between male and female individuals. This is consistent with sex and gender-based features of HIV infection and overlap between the two diseases will highlight potential mechanistic pathways of disease and guide research questions and policy interventions. In this review, the emerging findings from SARS-CoV-2 infection will be placed in the context of sex and gender research in the more mature HIV epidemic. Recent findings: This review will focus on the new field of literature on prevention, immunopathogenesis and treatment of SARS-CoV-2 referencing relevant articles in HIV for context from a broader time period, consistent with the evolving understanding of sex and gender in HIV infection. Sex-specific features of epidemiology and immunopathogenesis reported in COVID-19 disease will be discussed and potential sex and gender-specific factors of relevance to prevention and treatment will be emphasized. Summary: Multilayered impacts of sex and gender on HIV infection have illuminated pathways of disease and identified important goals for public health interventions. SARS-CoV-2 has strong evidence for a male bias in disease severity and exploring that difference will yield important insights.

Hidden in plain sight: sex and gender in global pandemics

Funding Opportunity: Stark Neurosciences Pre-Clinical Neuroimaging Pilot Grant

December 18, 2020

The goal of the Pre-Clinical Neuroimaging Research Pilot Study program is to facilitate the generation of new knowledge in the neurosciences through the development of funded research programs. This mechanism will provide seed-support up to $10,000 for innovative, high-risk animal imaging projects using the Bruker BioSpec 9.4T PET-MRI scanner using the IIBIS In-Vivo Imaging Core. Applicants (the contact PI) from one of the following three categories are eligible to apply: Category 1: New investigators without current or past NIH research support as PD/PI. Category 2: Established investigators who do not belong to Category 1 and do not have neuroimaging experience but wish to apply neuroimaging to enhance their current research. Category 3: Established neuroimaging investigators who do not belong to Category 1 & 2 and propose testing innovative ideas that represent clear departure from ongoing research interests. Award amount is up to $10,000 for one year.

Funding Opportunity: Stark Neurosciences Pre-Clinical Neuroimaging Pilot Grant

Funding Opportunity: Center for Diabetes & Metabolic Diseases Pilot & Feasibility Grant

December 18, 2020

A primary research-related activity of the Center for Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases (CDMD)’s Pilot and Feasibility (P&F) program is to foster the development of new diabetes-related investigators and provide seed-support for innovative, high-risk projects. The CDMD P&F program has two different grant mechanisms: Full P&F Grants: This mechanism will fund up to $50,000. Core P&F Grants: This mechanism will fund up to $5,000 for IDRC core usage. These “core bucks” will allow both new and established investigators to obtain key preliminary data for a developing area of diabetes-related research. This funding opportunity announcement invites applications from investigators at Indiana University School of Medicine and other Indiana University campuses (IU Bloomington, IU Muncie, etc.), Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), Purdue University, University of Notre Dame and the Indiana Biomedical Research Institute (IBRI).

Funding Opportunity: Center for Diabetes & Metabolic Diseases Pilot & Feasibility Grant

Small Singapore study finds pregnant women with Covid do not get more sick than general population

December 18, 2020

Pregnant women with Covid-19 do not get more sick than the wider population, according to a Singapore study published on Friday, which also found that babies born to infected mothers have antibodies against the novel coronavirus.

Small Singapore study finds pregnant women with Covid do not get more sick than general population

Unequal burden: how the COVID-19 pandemic is adding to women’s workloads

December 18, 2020

COVID-19 restrictions mean both men and women spend longer doing jobs around the home. Women have seen a larger increase in unpaid work than men. Evidence shows that COVID-19 is reinforcing traditional social and cultural gender norms. A new report for UN Women analyses data from 38 countries around the world.

Unequal burden: how the COVID-19 pandemic is adding to women’s workloads

Anxiety, depression, and knowledge level in postpartum women during the COVID-19 pandemic

December 18, 2020

Purpose: This study aimed to assess anxiety, depression, and knowledge level in postpartum women during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design and methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 212 postpartum women using a web-based online survey in Ankara, Turkey.

Anxiety, depression, and knowledge level in postpartum women during the COVID-19 pandemic

Sex-based Approach for the Clinical Impact of the Increased Hemoglobin on Incident AF in the General Population

December 18, 2020

Background and objectives: Although the adverse cardiovascular effect of anemia has been well described, the effect of polycythemia on the incident atrial fibrillation (AF) remain unclear. The objective of this study is to identify the association between increased hemoglobin and incident AF.

Sex-based Approach for the Clinical Impact of the Increased Hemoglobin on Incident AF in the General Population

Talk is cheap: Why we make healthy claims but indulge in unhealthy behaviors

December 17, 2020

The time period between Thanksgiving and Christmas is characterized by overindulgence. While we tell others that we are eating and drinking in moderation, controlling our spending, and exercising more, in reality, we do the exact opposite. So where does this disconnect come from? Often when responding to questions about sensitive behaviors (for example, weight gain, over-eating, alcohol consumption), people want to appear socially “correct” while downplaying bad behaviors. Psychologists call this subconscious response social desirability bias (SDB), and for researchers who are trying to understand a person’s actual behavior, these biased responses are a problem.

Talk is cheap: Why we make healthy claims but indulge in unhealthy behaviors

Gender specific differences in COVID-19 knowledge, behavior and health effects among adolescents and young adults in Uttar Pradesh and Bihar, India

December 17, 2020

On March 24, 2020 India implemented a national lockdown to prevent spread of the novel Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) among its 1.3 billion people. As the pandemic may disproportionately impact women and girls, this study examines gender differences in knowledge of COVID-19 symptoms and preventive behaviors, as well as the adverse effects of the lockdown among adolescents and young adults.

Gender specific differences in COVID-19 knowledge, behavior and health effects among adolescents and young adults in Uttar Pradesh and Bihar, India

A systematic review involving 11,187 participants evaluating the impact of COVID-19 on anxiety and depression in pregnant women

December 17, 2020

COVID-19 has started to spread within China since the end of December 2019. As a special population, the pregnant and delivery women maybe influenced both in physical and psychological aspects. The meta-analysis was conducted about mental health in pregnant and delivery women.

A systematic review involving 11,187 participants evaluating the impact of COVID-19 on anxiety and depression in pregnant women

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